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Common Core? Try rotten core

| Saturday, May 25, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Even parents who home-school their children cannot protect them from public schools' revisionist history, courtesy of the expanding Common Core Curriculum.

New workbooks for General Educational Development (GED) tests — administered to about 800,000 students annually — now include Common Core's liberal talking points, report Larissa and Oleg Atbashian for the American Thinker.

Common Core is the new federalized curriculum that's being administered or coming soon to a public school near you.

To call this tommyrot would be unrealistically kind:

• From a social studies text titled “Does Foreign Aid Really Help?”: “Poorer countries, because they have weak governments, often have areas that attract terrorist groups because no one is there to stop them from pursuing those types of activities.”

No, impoverished people typically suffer under unrestrained governments that steal their freedom and property.

• From the same text: “This is in fact what happened on 9/11 when terrorists from Afghanistan hijacked planes and carried out attacks on the United States.”

No, the majority of the hijackers came from wealthy Saudi Arabian families.

• And, naturally, a “scientific text” on global warming blames mankind and excludes any mention of cyclical world temperatures.

This centrally administered garbage that doesn't qualify as good fiction will continue to pile up until parents demand that their well-compensated school administrators take out the trash.

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