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Sunday pops

| Saturday, June 8, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Samantha Power, President Obama's nominee to be the next U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, once promoted a foreign policy referred to as the “Mea Culpa Doctrine,” running around the world apologizing for just about anything the United States ever did to offend anybody else. Mr. Obama bows, Ms. Power curtsies. What a pair. ... FBI statistics show that more than 73 million background checks for gun purchases have been made since Barack Obama assumed the presidency in January 2009. And they've increased markedly each year he's been in office. Gee, wonder why. Ahem. ... The first rule of thumb if you're filing for workers' comp injury relief and claiming you can't stand, sit, kneel, squat, climb, bend, reach or grasp is not to appear on “The Price is Right” and, before millions of viewers, lift your arms high and spin the big wheel not once but twice — or to go ziplining on a cruise. Cathy Wrench Cashwell, a North Carolina postal carrier, did just that. She was convicted of fraud Monday last. She'll likely still be able to watch “The Price is Right” in prison. But we're sure she'll have to forgo the ziplining. ... The Heritage Foundation reports that a Christmas tree tax has made its way back into the abomination that is the farm bill. A new tax of up to 20 cents per fresh-cut tree will pay for a federal Christmas Tree Promotion Board, whose goal will be “to enhance the image of Christmas trees and the Christmas tree industry in the United States.” Count us among those shocked to learn that Christmas trees have an image problem.

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