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Pay up

| Sunday, June 9, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The Corbett administration's response to news that Pennsylvania's largest public employee union hasn't been reimbursing the state for the costs of processing members' voluntary political action committee donations via paycheck deduction — as its contract requires — should consist of two words: “Pay up.”

And if verbal persuasion isn't effective, the state must do whatever it takes to force American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council 13 to live up to its contractual obligations. A contract is a contract, after all.

This outrage was revealed in a sworn state Office of Administration affidavit uncovered through a Right to Know law request and obtained by the Trib.

And get this: That request was filed by a Bucks County activist and union opponent within that very same office — which just as outrageously maintains that the costs at issue are minimal and doesn't seem all that interested in collecting what's owed.

That stance ignores the fact that these processing costs — no matter the amounts — aren't taxpayers' burden to bear. Plus, the union wouldn't sit still if the state weren't living up to its contractual obligations. Neither should Pennsylvania regarding this reimbursement provision.

Failure to ensure that AFSCME Council 13 pays what it owes would be nothing less than dereliction of the Corbett administration's duty to abide by the rule of law, honor contracts and do right by taxpayers.

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