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The Thursday wrap

| Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The movie “Gasland Part II,” the sequel to the fact-challenged anti-fracking film, features a scene in which a man lights something coming from his garden hose. The only problem is that the depiction is a hoax, as ruled by a Texas court. The hose had been connected to a gas vent. So much for a fair and balanced debate on the issue. ... Fox News reports that a Nevada family, forced at gunpoint in 2011 to surrender its home to police seeking tactical advantage in dealing with a neighboring domestic dispute case, has filed a Third Amendment challenge. But given that “police” are not “soldiers” (even when they recklessly act like an invading army), expect the case to be tossed. That said, the family likely does have a case under various other laws. Those against official oppression and malicious trespass come to mind. ... A pair of Columbia University researchers say the evidence supporting the need for outdoor smoking bans is “weak.” Writing in the journal Health Affairs, they also say such a flimsy rationale “is hazardous for public health policymakers, for whom public trust is essential.” Think of the boy who cried “Wolf!”... The latest round of Obama administration rules and regulations will cost Americans a bundle. The American Action Forum puts the bundle's price tag at $133 billion. Makes one long for the days when government rules and regs were measured in the mere millions of dollars, doesn't it?

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