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Fighting summertime crime: What Connellsville residents can do

| Friday, July 5, 2013, 8:57 p.m.

Police in Connellsville and other locales have been busy in recent weeks.

Recently, city residents awoke to slashed tires. More than 60 vehicles throughout Connellsville were damaged. Police quickly apprehended six suspects.

Reports of burglaries and robberies also have kept our local police busy.

It seems summer is a season for more crime, petty thefts, vandalism, camp burglaries, excessive noise and fighting. And sometimes citizens don't approach their municipal leaders with their concerns.

If that's a sign of public satisfaction, fine. But if it's a sign of apathy — or citizens' fear to report crime — then that's a serious matter.

Some communities have citizen watch programs, and these can be beneficial. In Connellsville, a group of concerned residents is working with city police to start a neighborhood watch. We encourage residents to attend a planning session, scheduled 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at city hall.

Being on the lookout for criminal behavior is not paranoia. And reporting criminals to police is not snitching. It is being good citizens — part of government “by the people” that we purport to cherish.

Simply calling the police and not getting the desired outcome is not a sign of inefficiency. On the other hand, we occasionally ignore festering crime-related issues until they become major problems.

If you have concerns, talk to local police and municipal leaders. And attend next week's crime watch meeting and lend your support.

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