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Selling ObamaCare

| Tuesday, July 16, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Young concertgoers in Washington state may soon find a greeting in a most unexpected place when nature calls: a pitch for ObamaCare in portable toilets.

That's right. In the mad dash to sign up young people, who are either blissfully ignorant or reluctant to shell out for ObamaCare, some states are pulling out all the stops — from using flying banners via airplanes to reach beachgoers to promos at baby-changing stations.

One media company estimates that by 2015, both sides in the ObamaCare debate will have spent $1 billion to get their messages across, The Washington Post reports.

Add this to the cost of health care, courtesy of a centrally planned nightmare that bows this fall.

One of the more inane ad markets reportedly will be bourbon festivals across Kentucky. This, when alcohol abuse costs federal, state and local governments more than $94 billion annually, according to a 2011 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.

But here's the rub: While Kentucky's “rolling out the barrel” to entice young people, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has proposed using ObamaCare grant money to “reduce alcohol retail outlet density and illegal alcohol,” according to a New York Post report cited by The Heritage Foundation.

Obviously in ObamaCare's fevered pitch for young health-exchange participants, one hand knows not what the other is doing.

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