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Chicken Littlest: More hot air from Obama

| Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Of all the Chicken Littles of climate change insisting that the sky is rapidly warming and that we must do something, President Obama of late is emerging as the Chicken Littlest.

Mr. Obama warns that the climate today is warming at an accelerated rate — “faster than anybody anticipated five or 10 years ago” — and that the future “is going to depend on our willingness to deal with something we may not be able to see or smell.”

On the contrary, the smell of what's he's spreading around is quite distinctive.

At a recent Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing, a panel of five scientists were asked twice whether they stood by the president's assessment, The Heritage Foundation reports. Their initial response?

Silence.

“There is little or no observational evidence that severe weather of any type has worsened over the last 30, 50 or 100 years, irrespective of whether any changes could be blamed on human activities anyway,” said Dr. Roy Spencer, principal research scientist at the University of Alabama, according to a Heritage report.

Yet it is Obama's unrelenting objective to force upon America — still in the throes of a stagnant economy — a solution in search of a problem.

And Obama says he has no patience with climate change “deniers”?

The president should be more concerned that Americans, increasingly skeptical of his unfounded climate claims, are losing patience with him.

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