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Civic-minded young people: Heed their lesson

| Friday, Aug. 23, 2013, 8:57 p.m.

There are clear indications throughout the Fay-West area that we live in a community where young people are getting the message that we all have civic responsibilities.

We've seen Connellsville football players out in the community helping with cleanup efforts. A group of Connellsville Area High School graduates as well as current students recently were instrumental in the construction of the new Cat's Courts in Connellsville.

In addition, Geibel students have undertaken various projects in the Fayette County area. And we cannot forget the many projects local Boy and Girl Scout organizations have completed that benefit our communities.

Here's hoping such lessons last a lifetime and that these civic-minded students continue to be concerned about our towns.

Some adults could benefit from these lessons, too.

Most of us “get involved” only when we have a specific concern — higher taxes, a rundown neighboring property, noise ordinance violations, etc.

Community involvement benefits everyone. It's easy to lose track of what local leaders are doing, and perhaps some of them would like it that way. But they need direction from their constituents.

This is a municipal election year — and a good time for “wise” adults to speak up and get involved in their community.

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