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Greensburg Tuesday takes

| Monday, Aug. 19, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

It's showtime!: Some Greensburg Salem School Board members are aghast — or so they say — that the base salaries of six administrators were inflated to boost their retirement benefits, according to a state audit. And, yes, it is appalling that district staffers reportedly raised concerns over this practice, even pointed out the state rules, but nevertheless were ordered by “administrators” to comply. Yet despite board members' “concerns,” no one's saying who supposedly gave the order to pump up the pensions. It took a Right to Know request from the Trib just to pry loose the names of the administrators who benefited.

Better management: Ligonier Township supervisors are looking into the possibility of bringing aboard a municipal manager after an audit revealed the “unofficial” Internet pursuits of a former supervisor, who has since resigned, and an ex-interim secretary-treasurer, fired for allegedly running an “Internet flea market” on her office computer. Given these embarrassments, consideration of professional management would be a prudent step.

All aboard?: A program being touted as a “safety blitz” this October in West Newton, in cooperation with CSX Corp., is aimed at increasing residents' awareness of the dangers around the rails and at railroad crossings. Especially for folks who live near tracks and get accustomed to trains, a safety refresher is a good idea. Just as it would be in other locales, where blaring train whistles too often have signaled tragedies.

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