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The race for governor: Corbett's troubles

| Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

“I'll take ‘Political train wrecks' for $400, Alex.”

“Those who don't think Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett is in trouble.”

“Who is ‘nobody'?”

“Correct!”

These are difficult (if not panicked) days for the Republican incumbent seeking re-election next year. The hallmark of his legislative agenda — privatizing liquor — couldn't make it through the Republican-controlled Legislature (not even a watered-down version).

A major tax increase on the wholesale price of gasoline and diesel fuel was euphemized when it should have been euthanized.

Pension reform? Ha! Tick-tick-tick continues the clock counting down the time-bomb's detonation.

A light bulb went off a few months ago at Corbett headquarters (that after repeated pulls on the chain yielded no light and somebody discovered that the bulb needed to be screwed in). There's been a wholesale shake-up of his staff. Whether they are astute enough to install tone-deaf defeaters and a bully pulpit remains to be seen.

But just about every Democrat (and his brother, sister, cousin and third half-cousin twice removed by marriage) is ready to challenge Mr. Corbett. There's so much blood in the water that even former state Auditor General Jack Wagner has visions of easy pickin's and is toying with a run.

There are whispers anew of a GOP primary challenge (though that's about as likely as the Legislature cutting its size or seeing a salamander surfing on the Susquehanna).

Can this governorship be saved? Perhaps the better question is if it should be saved.

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