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The Thursday wrap

| Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The Weekly Standard's Bill Kristol notes that President Obama's speechwriters screwed up when they employed a Franklin Roosevelt quote to, they thought, buttress his case for intervention in Syria. The quote actually was used by FDR in 1935 to defend non-intervention in Latin America. The president's wordsmiths appear to be far from historysmiths. ... Colorado voters have recalled two heavily funded Democrat state legislators over stricter gun-control laws. Out are Senate President John Morse and Sen. Angela Giron. The good news is that you can mess with the Second Amendment only so much. The bad news is that Democrats still control the Centennial State's House and Senate. ... SeaWorld is the latest company to say it's cutting employee hours to avoid ObamaCare's employee mandate. The 70 percent of SeaWorld employees who are seasonal or part-time will see their work capped at 28 hours a week. It's just the latest in a long line of tributes to “progressivism.” ... There's talk that Comet ISON could be the greatest sky spectacle since Halley's Comet's appearance in April 1910. So bright it might be on Nov. 28 that it could be visible in broad daylight, scientists say. Or it could be a dud, they add. Think Comet Kohoutek, dubbed as the “comet of the century,” 40 years ago. It pretty much fizzled, as did Halley's return visit in 1986. Thus, we recommend holding off on any doomsday preparations.

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