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Be the squeaky wheel: Advance Armstrong

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Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, 8:57 p.m.
 

Armstrong County needs to make a little more noise, be the squeaky wheel every once in awhile. There is more to the region than just Allegheny, Westmoreland and Butler counties.

In that vein, cheers to the Armstrong County Industrial Development Council for its redesigned website, which showcases the county's industrial sites, available land and contacts for business leaders looking for locations.

It also — quite appropriately — highlights the quality of life.

We believe it's fair to say that over the years, a number of “transplants” to this area have become movers and shakers in business, community and government life. Newcomers bring new ideas and are looking for places to apply them.

When plans to complete the Route 28 expressway from Pittsburgh to Interstate 80 dried up with the funding, many local leaders were discouraged by losing this potential for growth. On the other hand, others — usually older members of the community — might have preferred the area to remain less developed, quieter.

But communities cannot remain stagnant. Without some sort of growth — the kind the county is trying to attract — we continue to lose young people and eventually the good things that make for a vibrant lifestyle.

Fall is a beautiful time of year in Armstrong County, so we encourage everyone to take the opportunity to invite visitors to enjoy the river, trails and parks and some fine restaurants. Let the wider world see what we have to offer.

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