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Fast & Furious: Not so fast

| Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

Whether the issue is ObamaCare or an executive diktat, President Obama's idea of “negotiation” is, quite simply, his way or the highway. How refreshing it is to see a federal judge remind Mr. Obama that he was elected president, not king.

U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson ruled Monday that the Justice Department cannot simply drop-kick a lawsuit over documents pertaining to the “Fast and Furious” gun-walking scandal. Since news broke of the administration's bungled operation that reportedly sent to Mexican drug cartels 2,000 weapons — one of which is linked to a Border Patrol agent's death — Justice has stonewalled the House's subpoenas for related documents.

So, the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee went to court. Justice, in turn, tried to have the case dismissed, arguing that the courts have no basis for interfering when such matters should be resolved through “negotiation.”

Fat chance, the judge ruled.

“Dismissing the case without hearing it would in effect place the court's finger on the scale, designating the executive as the victor based solely on his untested assertion that the privilege applies,” wrote Ms. Jackson, calling Justice's argument “flawed and selective.”

Last year, the House held Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt over his temerity in the document dispute. Now Mr. Holder has egg all over his face.

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