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The Thursday wrap

| Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

If you want a stark lesson in how messed up America's pimps for “progressivism” can be, consider one case before the U.S. Supreme Court this term. In Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, the court essentially is being asked to determine if states that amend their constitutions to ban discrimination in the name of ending discrimination are violating the U.S. Constitution's Equal Protection Clause. George Orwell would be proud. ... Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia has dropped his subscription to The Washington Post because it's too “shrilly liberal,” New York Magazine reports. He says The Post was “slanted and often nasty” in its “treatment of almost any conservative issue.” Frankly, we're surprised it took him so long to notice. ... Notes The Wall Street Journal, “If ethanol is the miracle its supporters claim, it shouldn't need a mandate or subsidies.” It's the standard axiom that should be applied to anything that government insists is “good.” ... “The Simpsons,” that iconic Fox show featuring Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie, has been renewed for a record 26th season. Excellence knows no bounds, after all. ... The Obama administration likes to tout how supposedly in tune it is with average American Joes and Josephines. But on the eve of the government shutdown, its State Department awarded a five-year, up-to-$5 million contract for custom handcrafted crystal stem- and barware for use at American embassies worldwide. Joe and Josephine, meet John and Teresa.

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