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Rouhani's words: Behind the verbiage

| Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, 8:57 p.m.

Before anyone embraces Iranian President Hassan Rouhani as a kinder, gentler Israel-hater, his words of late deserve considerably more scrutiny.

Consider Mr. Rouhani's so-called reversal (from predecessor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad) in “denouncing” the Holocaust, as reported by CNN. Based on a transcript of exactly what he said, provided by the Iranian Fars News Agency, Rouhani didn't denounce anything.

“There, what the Nazis did is condemned, (but) the aspects that you talk about, clarification of these aspects, is a duty of historians and researchers. I am not a history scholar.”

Talk about a tap dance to a non-answer.

Neither is there anything “sheepish” in Rouhani's leadership of Iran's Supreme National Security Council from 1989 through 2003. As Helle Dale documents for The Heritage Foundation, that encompasses the murder of 85 people at a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires and the deaths of 19 U.S. soldiers in the Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia.

Rouhani's so-called “charm offensive” comes on the heels of President Obama's indecisive, ineffectual “red-line” response to Syria's Bashar al-Assad. The U.S. fumbled the ball to Russian President Vladimir Putin, who not only ran with it but did an obnoxious end-zone dance on the op-ed page of The New York Times.

And Rouhani wants U.S. considerations? He deserves none until his words, backed up by action, translate into something meaningful.

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