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The ObamaCare treatment: Hold on to your wallets

| Monday, Oct. 14, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

ObamaCare's only a few weeks old, but mounting evidence of its outrageous cost hikes, especially for Americans who buy their own insurance plans, will be a bitter pill for Democrats to swallow.

How many Dimmycrats are going to stand up and defend that which so many ran away from in the 2012 and 2010 elections?

Among reports of premium price spikes, Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee have been compiling angry posts about ObamaCare's sticker shock from the HealthCare.gov Facebook account, The Hill newspaper reports.

Under the Affordable Care Act, health care providers must offer a “basic level of coverage,” which the Obama administration acknowledges will raise premiums for some patients, according to The Hill.

But ObamaCare's proponents say higher premiums “alone” don't tell the whole story. Why, there are savings to be realized on plan deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums.

Tell that to the fella whose premium for a family of five jumped from $789 per month to $1,700. Or the woman who said her premium shot up from $289 to $855.

Based on the government's sample of rates, premiums go up 121 percent for 27-year-old males and 62 percent for same-aged females in the Pittsburgh area, according to the Commonwealth Foundation.

The nightmare that is ObamaCare is just beginning. From this, Democrats in next year's congressional elections can run — but they cannot hide.

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