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For mayor of Pittsburgh: Elect Bill Peduto

| Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
City of Pittsburgh councilman and Democratic mayoral candidate Bill Peduto meets with Trib reporters and editors at the D.L. Clark Building in the North Side on Thursday, April 11, 2013.

It would be easy to say that voting for anybody in Tuesday's Pittsburgh mayoral election would be better than what the city has been subjected to during the seven-year tenure of Luke Ravenstahl. But it would not be fair to the man set to be elected Pittsburgh's next mayor on Tuesday. For Bill Peduto is anything but a nondescript “anybody.”

Mr. Peduto, 49, a Democrat of Point Breeze, faces token opposition from Republican Josh Wander of Squirrel Hill. And the good measure of this decent man was evident and impressive when, immediately after his primary election victory in May, and through words and deeds, he filled the void of a largely AWOL Mr. Ravenstahl. Peduto looked and acted like the mayor he will become in January.

Born and bred in Pittsburgh, Peduto loves the city and has dedicated his life to its betterment. And he has not simply visions of how to get the city moving but concrete plans. Witness his continuing dogged efforts to convince Slovenian LED light maker Grah Lighting to build a manufacturing facility in Pittsburgh and make it Grah's North American headquarters. It's just one of many examples we could cite. And it is the stuff of leadership.

Indeed, Peduto faces significant challenges — leading Pittsburgh out of state receivership, fixing a broken pension system and restoring integrity to a scandal-ridden police department being right at the top. But given that at long last Pittsburgh will have a leader blowing a trumpet offering a clear and crisp sound, he will meet these challenges with aplomb.

And that's why we endorse Bill Peduto for mayor.

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