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Repeal ObamaCare: Restitch America's fabric

| Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Government interventionism only begets more government interventionism. Government has to continually lie to cover up the predictable failures of its past lies. It's a vicious cycle that tears at the very fabric of America — from free markets and property rights, to freedom and liberty itself.

Welcome to ObamaCare.

In the latest intervention “required” to make sure the last intervention “works,” President Obama on Friday wiped the egg off his face with more egg and announced that those who really want to keep their insurance really can keep their insurance this time around.

That's as long as those big, bad insurance companies that necessitated the government takeover of health insurance — the same bad actors who have spent the last three-plus years overhauling their business models to comply with the last government intervention diktat — can, in a matter of weeks, revert to their old “subpar,” “junk” and “predatory business practices” and policies of old. But just for one year, mind you.

And if they can't do that (or if state insurance commissioners, who have the final say, balk) because real markets aren't very functional in government command-and-control situations, well, hey, “We tried,” the Obama administration will say.

The only real solution is to scrap ObamaCare, remove government from our health care, restore the true meaning of “insurance” — to cover only the truly catastrophic, which will end the kind of overutilization that has fueled runaway premium and medical costs — and begin to restitch the fabric of America.

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