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The Thursday wrap

| Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The Washington Times reports that terrorists housed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, now can enroll in seminars to learn basic landscaping and pruning, calligraphy and Microsoft PowerPoint. Oh, and there also are lessons available in water color, acrylic and pastel painting. And it's costing U.S. taxpayers only $5 million. ... Headline on The Daily Caller's account of Education Secretary Arne Duncan backtracking on his slam against “white suburban moms” learning that “their child isn't as brilliant as they thought they were” — “Arne Duncan wishes he would have expressed his racist sentiments more skillfully.” ... In a glitch-filled Internet broadcast sponsored by Organizing for Action, President Obama on Monday claimed that 100 million Americans had successfully signed up for the new ObamaCare insurance plans in the first month. The actual number, of course, is about 106,000. Hey, what are a few extra zeros when you're a serial embellisher? ... Weather forecasters are predicting a doozy of a winter for Great Britain, the Express newspaper reports. Try “heavy and persistent snow for up to three months” and “extreme cold,” the worst winter there since 1947. The first blast is expected to hit on Monday. Guess the Brits should cancel that bulk order of Bermuda shorts and Hawaiian shirts for all that global warming, eh? All together now — “Honey, throw some more coal on the fire. It's getting cold outside.”

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