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'China City'

| Sunday, Dec. 8, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

There are plenty of reasons for officials to block proposed development of an all-Chinese city in New York's Catskills — the most compelling being its potential to expand the U.S. influence of a nation hostile to America.

Center for Immigration Studies ( cis.org) fellow David North details the China City of America (CCOA) project's doesn't-add-up budget and other problems in a new report. Among them is reliance on the economically ineffective, fraud- and failure-ridden U.S. EB-5 visa program that essentially sells “green cards” to foreign investors otherwise unable to enter America legally.

They must invest at least $500,000 and create at least 10 jobs. Claiming 255 investors, CCOA's first phase would have to create 2,550 full-time jobs; CIS says it's “difficult to see how this number can be reached.” Also, as CCOA targets regulated wetlands, it would need environmental permits that Mr. North suspects “are not issued easily in New York.”

But the most worrisome aspect is highlighted by North's sources within American branches of Falun Gong, the exercise/meditation/moral movement persecuted in China. He reports Falun Gong concerns about boosting China's U.S. influence and CCOA investment ultimately coming from the Communist regime in Beijing.

National security thus is foremost among the many reasons why U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must deny EB-5 approval for this project.

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