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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

Though he upheld most of New York state's onerous new gun-control law, U.S. District Judge William M. Skretny in Buffalo has given gun owners a small victory. Restricting to seven the number of bullets that may be loaded into a magazine (except at gun ranges) is “arbitrary” and a violation of the Second Amendment. The judge said such a restriction favors criminals. Small wonders never cease. ... The New York Times says the eyes of liberal America are on new New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio in hopes that his wild-eyed “populist” policy prescriptions will serve as a model elsewhere. As if anyone should aspire to emulate the Big Apple's coming implosion. ... The same Commonwealth Financing Authority responsible for awarding that $40 million in walking around money in the new Pennsylvania transportation budget likes to tout its transparency. But as the Trib's Brad Bumsted and Melissa Daniels point out, the website of its mothership, the Department of Community and Economic Development, has no links to the authority's agendas, minutes or project votes. That's not very transparent. ... Writing in the American Thinker, Heartland Institute scholar Norman Rogers reminds that the claim that solar power is on the brink of being competitive is “a fantasy.” The industry, he notes, would collapse without government subsidies. Other than that, solar power is just peachy-keen.

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