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Pittsburgh Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014, 8:55 p.m.

Laurel: To Bill Peduto. Pittsburgh's new mayor, as promised, has begun releasing his daily schedule. That's a breath of fresh air after former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl's steadfast refusal to treat the public's business as, well, the public's business. Letting the sunshine in is good for everybody. Here's to transparency.

On the “Watch List”:

The flu. The H1N1 strain of influenza, commonly referred to as swine flu, is sweeping through the region. Local hospital officials say a number of patients have become critically ill from the potent strain and there has been at least one death. The current flu vaccine does includes protection against swine flu. And it's not too late to get a shot. Get one!

• Water lines. First came the deep freeze. Now comes the warm-up. And that's playing havoc with water mains. The extreme contraction and expansion of the equally extreme freeze-thaw cycle is what leads to cracking in mains, especially older ones. And with readings in the 40s and even the 50s expected this weekend, the batch of breaks could be particularly bad.

• True “progressivism”: Here's a challenge for the “progressives” now fully in control of Pittsburgh city government: Washington, D.C., could see a ballot issue in November that would allow residents to grow up to six marijuana plants in each household for personal use and limited transfer. It's a smart step on the road to decriminalization. So, where are Pittsburgh's true “progressives”?

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