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The Benghazi scandal: More lies

| Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014, 8:55 p.m.

As soon as it hit the street, The New York Times' 7,500-word opus dismissing any al-Qaida link to the Benghazi massacre in Libya drew blistering criticism. Now along comes The Washington Post with a report that a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, linked directly to al-Qaida, participated in the Sept. 11, 2012, U.S. outpost attack that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.

In its bungled Benghazi spin, the old Gray Lady has stumbled badly.

Ex-Guantanamo inmate Abu Sufian bin Qumu and his Ansar al-Sharia “militiamen” — more accurately, terrorists — were directly involved in the Benghazi attack, The Post reports. A career terrorist, he trained with Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan, fought the U.S. there and eventually was captured and sent to Guantanamo, reports Patrick Brennan for National Review Online. He was turned over to the Libyan government and subsequently was released.

Never mind Times writer Daniel D. Kirkpatrick's assertion, echoing the Obama administration, that an obscure trailer for an anti-Muslim film was “the fuse” that somehow ignited the Benghazi attack.

More insightful than The Times' pleonastic Dec. 28 Benghazi “wrap” is the dead-on observation a few days later by Andrew C. McCarthy, senior fellow at the National Review Institute: “The Times report is a labor of love in the service of President Obama and, in particular, the Hillary Clinton 2016 campaign ramp-up.” That covers it.

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