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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

Comcast, which shook down taxpayers for $42.8 million to build its 58-story Comcast Center in Philadelphia a decade ago, is rationalizing its theft of $40 million from the taxpayers' swag to build a 59-story skyscraper in Philadelphia by projecting that it will return $75 million in tax receipts to city and state coffers during the construction phase. In other words, the public will pay a $40 million premium to get $35 million in net new tax revenues. Great deal, eh? ... Waaaaay back in 2009 and 2010, economist-turned-New York Times columnist Paul Krugman wrote in two textbooks that extended unemployment benefits can increase unemployment by delaying the unemployeds' search for new jobs. But these days, Mr. Krugman, full of “progressive” Kool-Aid, argues that extended benefits increase employment. Perhaps for those working in the unemployment offices. ... To “defeat poverty,” Toledo, Ohio, Block Bugler ambassadorialist Dan Simpson advocates emulating the French and taxing the part of salaries exceeding $1.36 million at an effective rate of 75 percent. Which will spawn massive capital flight, reduce government tax receipts and make us all poorer. Ever hear of Andrew Mellon, Dan? ... There's supposedly a shortage of Velveeta, the meltable processed cheese, just as “peak season” for it arrives (think the NFL playoffs and the Super Bowl). The “shortage” was announced by Velveeta parent Kraft Foods. Surely we're not the only ones who smell a velvety rat.

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