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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

Stanford University law professor John J. Donohue claims the Second Amendment, which prohibits Congress from infringing the right to keep and bear arms, actually permits strong gun control. He says that's because, in part, the Framers could not envision modern firepower. Neither could the Framers have envisioned high-speed printing presses or electronic communications. Does this mean, dear professor, that modern press and speech capabilities don't enjoy First Amendment protections? ... Meet Chloe Stirling, 11, of Troy, Ill. A day after her local newspaper did a feature story on her burgeoning cupcake business, operated out of her parents' kitchen, the Madison County Health Department shut her down. It wanted the child's family to either build a bakery or a kitchen separate from her parents'. “Public health” was cited by the government. Not only was Chloe trying to raise money to buy a car when she turns 16, she's well known for baking cupcakes to raise money for a schoolmate with cancer and for a cancer fundraiser. The government is an ass. ... The same thing happened three years ago to Mark Stambler of Los Angeles. Health officials shut him down (but not up) for selling homemade baked bread. But he became an activist and lobbied for passage of a “cottage food” law. Since going into effect a year ago, Forbes.com reports, California's cottage food industry has exploded, creating more than a thousand new local businesses. Government getting out of the way — and getting its head out of its you-know-what — never looked so good.

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