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Saturday essay: Vladimir Obama

| Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, 8:57 p.m.

“Six words,” I told Mike Pintek on KDKA radio Thursday afternoon: “You say you want a revolution.” Strong words. And just as strong are the words “intimidation,” “totalitarianism” and “tyranny.”

All were apropos as we discussed the Obama administration's latest assault on the American fabric: Whether of its own volition (doubtful) or acting as the latest presidential sycophants (likely), the Federal Communications Commission planned to descend on radio, television and even newspaper newsrooms (though it has no authority over the latter) to, essentially, make sure the Fourth Estate is covering news to the government's satisfaction.

Participation supposedly was to be voluntary — but no doubt with license renewal hanging over broadcast outlets and the IRS ready to pounce on print properties in a shocking assault on the First Amendment. The FCC backtracked late Friday.

This was no objective fact-finding mission, as the FCC claims. The totalitarian-minded Obama administration, no longer content to merely use your tax dollars to spin its decidedly un-American message of redistributionism and dependency, now seeks to control the messengers as well.

Who does Barack Obama think he is,Vladimir Putin?

It once was written that the history of liberty not only is the history of limitations of governmental power but the history of resistance. Now is no time to keep liberty's sword sheathed.

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