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Corbett's fortunes: Troubling truths

| Saturday, March 1, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

It oftentimes takes an outsider to place into proper perspective the insider game that is politics. Those too close to a political scenario typically might see the trees but the forest remains opaque in a heavy fog.

But a Thursday assessment in The Wall Street Journal burns off that fog and exposes a hardly flattering portrait for Gov. Tom Corbett, now seeking a second term. It should shake the Shaler Republican to his foundation and cause the GOP-controlled Legislature to radically overhaul its mission.

Mr. Corbett's “re-elect numbers” have been running between “abysmal” and “are you kidding?” Here's how The Journal's Allysia Finley sees it:

“The truth is that Mr. Corbett and the state's Republican legislature have accomplished little in the way of reform over the past three years to stoke economic growth. The governor has proven unable to corral his caucus to pass even de minimis pension, school and tax reforms. The GOP's moderates and tea party wing have often tangled over the size and scope of reform while Mr. Corbett sat on the sidelines.”

And no matter what Democrat emerges from a crowded primary field or what outside money influences might or might not come into play, Ms. Finley concludes that if Corbett loses in November, “most of the credit will belong to Mr. Corbett.”

Ouch. But the truth usually hurts.

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