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The Thursday wrap

| Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

If you want an idea of how absolutely screwed up Norway's Nobel Institute is, consider that it has nominated Vladimir Putin for the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize. No, it has nothing to do with his invasion of Ukraine but, incredibly, for his work to bring “peace” to Syria. See, opportunism really does have its rewards. ... The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia has reinstated a law that bars funeral homes from serving food. As if this should be any of “the state's” business. Here's to the industry thumbing its nose at idiocy. Cabbage rolls, anyone? ... The federal Earned Income Tax Credit program already loses about $11 billion annually to improper payments. Yet the Obama administration, in its proposed fiscal 2015 budget, seeks to expand it at an additional cost of $60 billion over the next decade. This would add an estimated 13.5 million Americans to the rolls of those who don't pay any taxes. And the state of dependency grows and grows and grows. ... A poll suggests that an overwhelming majority of residents in Virginia, New Jersey and New York support a federal gun registry. What a tragedy that so many supposedly educated people can be such sheeple. And at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson surely must be spinning in his grave. ... How bad is “global warming”? (“How bad is global warming, Johnny?”) It's so bad that Niagara Falls has frozen over. Throw two more logs on the fire, honey. This climate change thing is getting out of control.

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