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Sunday pops

| Saturday, March 8, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

“Suicide by jellyfish,” “injured during the forced landing of your spacecraft,” “sucked into the engine of an airplane” and “horse-drawn carriage collided with a trolley” are among categories for new codes physicians will be required to use beginning Oct. 1 to comply with federal rules to meet new World Health Organization guidelines, reports The Weekly Standard. It says the number of codes will expand from 17,000 to 155,000. Does anyone still wonder why “health care” is out of control? ... In New Republic magazine, Ezekiel Emanuel, brother of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, predicts that ObamaCare will bring about the death of private insurance companies. Far from bemoaning the development, he cheers it, saying “you won't have insurance companies to kick you around anymore.” Who can doubt that this isn't the true goal of ObamaCare? And how many Americans will die — yes, we said die — because Barack Obama and the Dimmycrats ignorantly believe government knows best? ... Georgia could become the first state to pass a measure calling for a Convention of States, better known as a constitutional convention, as prescribed in Article V of the U.S. Constitution. Such a convention can't be held until 34 states agree. But if you think the day-to-day machinations of Congress are bad, those in a constitutional convention could set a new standard. While the idea of a constitutional convention is great in theory, oh, be careful for what you wish and make sure you keep your powder dry.

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