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Alle-Kiski Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, March 13, 2014, 8:55 p.m.

On the “Watch List”:

• The Highlands School Board. The board's wise decision to publish its list of delinquent taxpayers is paying dividends. The district expects to collect more than $1 million — that's more than 1 mill of property tax generates. So will the board cut taxes and return some money to the people who have been propping up the district for those who didn't pay?

• The Springdale Council. It appears council is looking to play nice with the new police chief, the mayor and each other. We hope so. Perhaps the members have figured out how petty and foolish they've looked in recent months. The chief was brought in to clean up your cesspool of a police department; give him a chance to do it.

• Prospect Cemetery. The future of the historic cemetery in Brackenridge will likely be up to an Allegheny County judge, but the biblical Solomon probably couldn't come up with a solution here. Putting the cemetery's maintenance on the borough might be a good idea, except the 1923 state law governing this limits municipal spending to $30 per year per cemetery. That's only about $16,000 less than needed.

• Pennsylvania Municipal Services. On the same day landlords in New Kensington sued the city Sanitary Authority over PAMS' heavy-handed — and allegedly illegal — collection methods, the Arnold Council heard the same complaints from its residents.

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