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Keystone caper: Pipeline politics

| Friday, April 18, 2014, 8:57 p.m.

Having sat on the Keystone XL oil pipeline decision for six years, President Obama told a group of governors recently that he expects to make up his mind “in a couple of months.”

Then the White House refused to acknowledge that much, The Hill newspaper reports.

According to the official administration line, a decision will come “only after careful consideration of the environmental impact statement and other pertinent information.”

But the State Department already has conclusively determined that the crude oil pipeline from Canada to the Gulf would not increase greenhouse gas emissions. So now the administration supposedly is awaiting a “review” on whether the project is in the national interest, along with a recommendation from Secretary of State John Kerry — who reportedly is being urged not to make any snap judgments. Seriously?

Clearly the administration is holding as hostage a vital U.S. energy project that will create jobs and poses a minimal environmental threat. And for what other conceivable reason except out of fear that eco-wackos deep in the Democratic Party will go ballistic during the midterm elections if the pipeline is approved.

As for going through the “process,” as this administration likes to say, “there is no more process,” says Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D.

Obama & Co. have hemmed and hawed enough. It's time to stop playing politics and approve the Keystone XL pipeline.

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