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Junk nutrition

| Sunday, April 20, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

The “success” of Michelle Obama's Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act is evidenced in school trash everywhere. That's where these meals are ending up, which explains why more than a million participants in the $12 billion federal school lunch program pulled out last year, according to the General Accountability Office.

Never mind kids' own social media responses to lunches of mystery meat and miniscule chicken nuggets. “I'd like to thank Michelle Obama for this school lunch,” one student sarcastically tweeted.

And never mind the program's unrelenting regulations on everything down to weekly servings of “orange” vegetables.

In all, more than 500 schools have pulled out of the federal program because of the new Obama regulations — which defenders insist is insignificant compared with the 98,000 participating schools. What's indefensible is the amount of food that's reportedly being dumped because school kids aren't eating it, according to Investor's Business Daily.

And what happens when hungry children don't eat school lunches? That's right: They load up after school on pound-packing junk-food calories.

And, sadly, poorer school districts get stuck with government's meal diktats while wealthier districts have the financial means to set their own menus — for now.

Whether it's where children are forced to attend school or what they're forced to eat, government's proclivity to push parents aside in matters that directly affect their children will continue — until parents push back.

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