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Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

Bank of America says it made a $4 billion accounting error, as in it has $4 billion less capital than it thought. Not only did the mistake go undetected for several years, it made it past the banking giant's audit committee and even PricewaterhouseCoopers, its external auditors. Said one analyst, “There are signs that controls are not as tight as they need to be.” Consider it the understatement of the week. Oh, and don't try this at home. ... The United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 1776, vociferously opposed to privatizing liquor and liberalizing beer sales in Pennsylvania, has begun airing a wholly deceptive TV ad that suggests North Carolina's privatized alcohol system is the reason that one child per week, on average, died last year in underage drinking-related accidents. But the source cited in the ad makes absolutely no link to how alcohol is sold in The Tar Heel State. Truth continues to be the first casualty in the liquor union's fight to preserve its non-reason for its existence and the Keystone State's liquor monopoly. ... The Competitive Enterprise Institute calculates that the cost of U.S. federal regulations now is larger than the economies of all but nine countries in the world. The free market think tank says the annual $15,000 cost for households to comply with those regulations likely is one of their highest single household expenses. Stated another way, as did Investor's Business Daily, U.S. regulatory costs are the world's No. 10 economy. The most effective use of capital this is not.

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