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Sunday pops

| Saturday, May 3, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court bootedArdmore businessman Bob Guzzardi from May's Republican gubernatorial primary ballot for doing what a Department of State employee said he could do — namely, not meet a deadline for filing his financial disclosure form. Inquiring minds want to know if that employee is a Tom Corbett supporter. ... Under the new Pennsylvania law that allows small games of chance in local taverns, bar owners get to keep only 35 percent of the proceeds. Local governments get 5 percent. But state government's take is 60 percent. Isn't that an organized government racket? ... Democrats are pushing for a constitutional amendment giving Congress the power to impose the kind of campaign finance limits already ruled as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. Attempting to amend the Constitution to restrict a right is un-American. ... Democrats once again are railing at Republicans for blocking their attempt to raise the minimum wage. The word “racists” even has been thrown around. But as black economics scholar Thomas Sowell reminds, the original intent of wage floors decades ago was to protect labor unions and price minorities out of the job market. Democrats really are Dimmycrats. ... Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston calls his leaving a Florida grocery store without paying for $33 worth of crawfish and crab legs a moment of “youthful ignorance.” Oh, so that's the euphemism these days for stealing, theft and petty larceny, eh?

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