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The climate den

| Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

One day while she is walking, an acorn falls from a tree and hits the top of her little head. ‘My, oh, my, the sky is falling. I must run and tell the lion about it,' says Chicken Little and begins to run.

—“Chicken Little” (1916)

The Obama administration released the National Climate Assessment on Tuesday. And to sell its latest installment of pseudoscience in promotion of social re-engineering required to combat “man-made” climate change, it invited in select meteorologists to indoctrinate them in how to propagandize the report and bring climate-cluckerism into every home.

Be afraid — be very afraid.

So wrong in so many of its alleged causes and effects — a natural consequence of being so injurious to the scientific process — the assessment must be considered for what it is: a political manifesto that seeks to reorder the world economy for “the greater good,” a “good” that serves not mankind nor even the planet but those in positions of government power.

“This report is part of the game the president is playing to distract Americans from his unchecked regulatory agenda that is costing our nation middle-class jobs, new economic opportunities and our ability to be energy independent,” said Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., chagrined by ramped up global warming alarmism.

Chicken Little, Henny Penny and Ducky Lucky never were heard from again after Foxey Loxey, insisting he knew where their savior lion lived, lured them into his den. Americans and America must resist a similar fate.

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