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The Antarctic ice: The other side

| Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

A not-so-funny thing happened on the way to much of the breathless reporting that “global warming” is destabilizing parts of the Antarctic ice sheet and, as The New York Times put it in a front-page story on Tuesday, could lead to “a rise in sea level of 10 feet or more ... in coming centuries.” It seems that much of the reportage has been quite selective.

The West Antarctic ice sheet has begun falling apart, two papers published in the journals Science and Geophysical Research Letters conclude. And many of the usual players in the “climate change” game are sounding the alarms of gloom, doom and holy moley pumpkin pie, we're all going to die.

But curiously not mentioned in The Times' report — and woefully too few other reports — is this salient fact:

East Antarctic sea ice coverage reached a record 3.5 million square miles in April, reports the National Snow and Ice Data Center. And the center says ice formation thus far in May continues at a record pace. The development has caught more than a few climate scientists by surprise — which is what happens when data that contradict the theology of global warming are ignored. You might recall, as The Daily Caller does, that December expedition to document the loss of ice getting trapped in record levels of ice.

Oh, and unlike The Times, which ignored the East Antarctic development, The Caller includes details of the West Antarctic ice story. Indeed, there are two sides to the climate story. And telling both sides goes a long way in debunking the hardly “settled science” of man-made “climate change.”

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