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Pittsburgh Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, May 22, 2014, 8:55 p.m.

On the “Watch List”:

• Highmark. Out of the blue (at least to the general public), the health insurance giant this week gave the boot to CEO William Winkenwerder, on the job less than two years. He was brought in after the Ken Melani mess. It was in June 2012 that Highmark board chairman J. Robert Baum said Mr. W. had “all of the attributes that we were looking for in a new CEO.” Hey, things change, right? The big question now is if the boot is golden: How much is Winkenwerder being paid to depart?

• David Holmberg. He's Winkenwerder's successor. Mr. Baum says Mr. Holmberg “will be the right leader at the right time to accelerate the transformation of our organization.” Until it's determined that he isn't, that is. Can he last more than 22 months?

• Frank C. Mosesso. On paid leave as police chief in Mt. Oliver since an October 2012 shoulder injury, he's now charged with using department checks to pay private bills and writing checks for cash. Mr. Mosesso says the money was used for police equipment and training. But police say he paid personal credit card bills and an electric bill, among other things. The major question that comes to mind, of course: Where was the oversight?

An exhortation: The Memorial Day weekend is upon us. Have a flag? Fly it. Don't have a flag? Buy it. It's the least you can do to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice, one that allows all of us to enjoy the freedoms we have today.

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