TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

The state of education: A necessary slap

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Sunday, June 15, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

A ruling that teacher tenure and layoffs by seniority violate the California Constitution deals a sharp, much-needed blow to laws and practices that put the interests of teachers before those of students.

Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Rolf Treu compared Vergara v. California to the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education racial-segregation case. He wrote that Brown was about the right of students “to equality of the educational experience” and Vergara is about their right to “quality of the educational experience.”

He ruled that California violates public school students' constitutional right to equal education by granting teachers tenure — after just two years — that makes firing even the worst practically impossible; by disregarding effectiveness with “last in, first out” teacher layoffs; and by disproportionately assigning ineffective teachers to predominantly minority and low-income schools. He said the “compelling” evidence “shocks the conscience” — but self-interested teachers unions quickly vowed they'd appeal anyway.

Their appeal deserves to do what too many students trapped in classrooms with bad teachers do: fail. That would encourage similar challenges elsewhere — Pennsylvania grants teachers lifelong tenure after three years — by Student Matters, the group funded by a Silicon Valley millionaire that backed Vergara's nine student plaintiffs. Judge Treu's ruling gives hope to parents, students and taxpayers nationwide who rightly believe their interests outweigh those of teachers unions.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Editorials

  1. EPA diktats: Pushing back
  2. The Box
  3. Sunday pops
  4. Regional growth
  5. Intrepid salute
  6. The Thursday wrap
  7. Kittanning Laurels & Lances
  8. Medicare @ 50: Sick, getting sicker
  9. Alle-Kiski Laurels & Lances