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Sunday pops

| Saturday, July 19, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

The Economist says a new study, analyzing two decades of data, concludes that Democrats are more likely to vote for “pro-gun” legislation as an election draws near. “Funny that,” the British magazine concludes. “Pandering pimps,” we conclude. ... The Obama administration might be painting a rosy picture of the federal deficit — the lowest thus far under Barack Obama's tenure — but the Congressional Budget Office is ringing the alarm bells. It reminds that the federal debt that today is 74 percent of the economy will explode to 106 percent by 2039. Spending and deficits must be curbed, the CBO warns. But, of course, that's anathema to “progressives,” who can't seem to wrap their brains around the Law of Diminishing Returns. ... To thwart U.S. spying efforts, German pols supposedly are playing classical music during meetings to muffle their conversations. There's even talk of using manual typewriters for sensitive correspondence. Encrypted smoke signals cannot be far behind. ... It was 45 years ago today that man first landed on the moon. And it remains one of mankind's seminal scientific achievements. So how does Buzz Aldrin, year after year, choose to remember the event? By recounting how even though he wasn't the first person to step on the lunar surface — that honor went to the late Neil Armstrong — he was the first person to urinate in his spacesuit on the moon. Thanks for sharing, Buzz, but the tale is growing rank.

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