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Alle-Kiski Tuesday takes

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Monday, July 21, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

Resign and repay: We have a couple of words to describe Cheswick “Councilmen” Jonathan Skedel and Neal Hohman: underhanded and wrong. Messrs. Skedel and Hohman quit participating in Cheswick's government in April 2013, but they still cash the $100 monthly stipend check. They refuse to resign, too. This isn't illegal — just immoral — and there's nothing the borough council can do except wait until their terms end in December 2015. Skedel and Hohman should resign immediately and reimburse the taxpayers.

Many thanks. A lot of local emergency management officials, inexperienced in dealing with a media horde at a breaking news event, become defensive, confrontational and dictatorial. Absolutely none of those terms describe South Buffalo Township Fire Chief Randy Brozenick. Faced with a media event during last week's drowning in the Allegheny River, Mr. Brozenick was cooperative, helpful and very professional.

Symptom of a disease: Officials are moving ahead with a reorganization of Westmoreland County's Common Pleas Court to allow for a drug court, which is expected to handle up to 40 defendants. Grants will be sought for its implementation. Sadly, a specific court for drug defendants is a response to the area's ongoing surge in cheap heroin, prescription painkiller abuse and rising overdose deaths.

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