Share This Page

Greensburg Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014, 8:55 p.m.

On the “Watch List”: The Jeannette Glass plant cleanup. As expected, Zion Bullitt is appealing a judge's ruling upholding the sale of the dilapidated plant. What wasn't common knowledge is that the consent order reached with Zion to clean up the property has an escape clause: If Zion cannot access the site for six or more months, the consent order becomes moot. And that would dump the remainder of the cleanup cost on the taxpayers.

Lance: To Monessen's missing property owners. Almost a third of the city's 734 blighted properties are owned by outsiders from 24 states and five foreign countries — and beyond the reach of Monessen officials. District Judge Joseph Dalfonso says Pennsylvania won't extradite someone from another state or country who owes fines and court courts. That has to change, and not just in Monessen. Local municipalities must have recourse to go after absentee landowners and make them pay for their disregard.

An observation: Traditionally, elementary students' class assignments and school bus schedules, published and/or listed online, heralded the start of school. But Franklin Regional, among other districts, is no longer providing this information publicly because of parents' privacy concerns, given the listing of addresses and the times when families would be leaving their homes. Parents will receive this information in the mail. And their concerns are justified. Indeed, times have changed.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.