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Pittsburgh Tuesday takes

| Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

Drawing power: A surge in use of North Park has occurred as private-sector contractors in recent years have added amenities to Allegheny County's largest park. The OTB Bicycle Cafe at the Boathouse, the Go Ape zipline course and rentals of canoes, kayaks and rowboats on the park's lake have proven so popular that county officials have had to expand parking capacity. That's good reason to repeat what we've said previously: Let's have more such ventures that enhance public assets without adding to taxpayers' burden.

Start of something big: Infrastructure work will follow this month's clearing of a former steel mill from the 178-acre former LTV Steel Co. site in Hazelwood. Downtown-based Regional Industrial Development Corp. and four foundations, partnering as Almono, envision more than $1 billion in residential, office and industrial development there over two decades, with two-thirds of new tax revenue the project generates paying off bonds in an $80 million tax-increment-financing plan. Close, sustained scrutiny must ensure that unlike too many TIFs, this one, the city's largest ever, doesn't make unwilling venture capitalists of taxpayers.

PNC Park prescription: Now hosting the Detroit Tigers after losing a home series to the San Diego Padres for the 14th consecutive time, the Pirates are free of that seeming jinx but still hurting from injuries. Chants of “Get well soon!” for Neil Walker and Andrew McCutchen can alternate with “Let's go Bucs!”

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