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Africa: A tragic continent

By Walter Williams
Here’s how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: “Anyone who believes President Bush’s Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it’s overly pessimistic, but most of …

Terrorism & the true believer

By Pat Buchanan
“A mass movement,” wrote Eric Hoffer in “The True Believer,” “appeals not to those intent on bolstering and advancing a cherished self, but to those who crave to be rid of an unwanted self. “Their innermost craving is for a …

The Pittsburgh Promise scholarship program: Promises & more promises

By Jake Haulk
The Pittsburgh Promise program that provides scholarships of up to $10,000 for four years to graduates of Pittsburgh Public Schools who meet certain qualifications continues to grab headlines. The program boasts of having spent over $55 million on 5,500 students. …

Donation helps CCAC strengthen health care programs

By Quintin B. Bullock
Recently I had the pleasure of participating in the dedication of the Prism Health Services Paramedic Laboratory at the Community College of Allegheny County Boyce Campus. CCAC made the decision to name the laboratory in honor of the former South …

Bipartisan plan for health care?

By Sean Parnell
The Center for American Progress released a health care reform plan in September it claimed should draw bipartisan support because it includes Republican ideas. But instead of drawing on the best ideas from both sides of the ideological divide, this …

Business, the Biden way

By Michelle Malkin
Everything you need to know about Beltway nepotism, corporate cronyism and corruption can be found in the biography of Robert Hunter Biden. The youngest son of Vice President Joe Biden made news after The Wall Street Journal revealed he had …

Good ol’ Warren G. & Silent Cal: Harding & Coolidge understood basic economics

By Amity Shlaes
Republicans and Democrats resemble one another too closely for voter comfort these days. Whatever their own political leanings, voters would prefer more diversity in the …

EXCLUSIVE TO THE TRIB: Escaping the Nepal avalanche

By Kevin Brezler
TAL, NEPAL (Oct. 17) My wife Cat and I are in the Annapurna mountain range, where at least 14 trekkers have died in avalanches in …

This week @ the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

By Tribune-Review
Tuesday, 8 p.m., Carnegie Music Hall, Pittsburgh — Retired Army Gen. David Petraeus delivers the final lecture of the American Middle East Institute’s 7th annual Business Conference. For more information on this or other programs, contact the World Affairs Council …

Ukraine should have U.S. weapons

By Carl Levin and James Inhofe
When Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko spoke to a joint session of Congress last month, he thanked the United States for its assistance in confronting Russian aggression and, indeed, our country, along with our NATO allies, has done much. But Poroshenko …

Does universal preschool help kids?

By Tribune-Review
In political campaigns around the country, at least one proposal enjoys bipartisan support: expanding early childhood education. In gubernatorial races in Florida, Texas, Alabama, Michigan …

Losing faith in Obama

By Charles Lipson
When presidents become unpopular, they are no longer welcome on the campaign trail. They’re trapped in Washington, watching their party abandon them. It happened to …

Verbatim

By Tribune-Review
“Regulators are little more than roadblocks standing in the way of innovation.” — Claire Caine Miller, writing in The New York Times, on government crackdowns on the likes of Lyft, Uber and Airbnb.com. “The message from Democrats has been the …

Minimum wage, maximum perversion

By Antony Davies & James R. Harrigan
Seattle’s Freedom Socialist Party recently advertised for a part-time web designer, offering $13 an hour. The problem? That very group advocates a $20 minimum wage. …

What federal persecutors hath wrought

By John Stossel
Federal prosecutors sometimes break rules and wreck people’s lives. President Obama might soon appoint one of them to be America’s next attorney general. The prosecutory bullying is detailed in Sidney Powell’s new book, “Licensed to Lie.” The Arthur Andersen accounting …

In the path of pipelines

By Marcia Greenberg
Homeowners and communities are unprepared for an invasion of their cherished private yards and public spaces. The Mid-Atlantic region is facing an expansion of natural …

The tardy Ebola czar

By Tribune-Review
LOSER. Ron Klain After President Obama appointed him the nation’s Ebola czar, Klain missed two White House meetings on the dreaded virus in three days. …

Running against Obama

By Byron York
In what is likely to become a theme of the last weeks of campaigning before the midterm elections, former President Bill Clinton all but begged voters during a visit in Arkansas not to use their vote as an expression of …

White House callous toward American lives

By Diana West
Do you get the feeling that the United States government is trying to get us all killed? OK, not all of us. Some of us. I almost don’t know how else to interpret the headlines, whether the issue is the …

America’s manufacturing comeback

By Jay Timmons
For a generation of young people who live in Greater Pittsburgh today, tales of factory smokestacks and heavy industry dominating the landscape seem like folklore from a bygone era. The site of U.S. Steel’s sprawling Homestead Works now hosts several …