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The price of papal popularity

By Pat Buchanan
Normally a synod of Catholic bishops does not provide fireworks rivaling the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. But on Oct. 13, there emanated from the Synod on the Family in Rome a 12-page report from a committee picked by …

The return of Clinton Democrats?

By Jonah Goldberg
Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes is running for the U.S. Senate in the great state of Kentucky. She is a woman of conviction, of substance, of principle. “I’m not an empty dress,” she insists, “I’m not a rubber stamp, and I …

Government twits on the prowl for ‘subversive’ tweets

By Ajit Pai
If you take to Twitter to express your views on a hot-button issue, does the government have an interest in deciding whether you are spreading “misinformation”? If you tweet your support for a candidate in the November elections, should taxpayer …

CDC’s mission creep

By Michelle Malkin
So now federal health bureaucrats in charge of controlling diseases and pandemics want more money to do their jobs. Maybe if they hadn’t been so busy squandering their massive government subsidies on everything but their core mission, we taxpayers might …

Bury carbon? Bury the idea, says Robert T. Smith

By Robert T. Smith
We have busied ourselves in a race between technology and nothing. Huge amounts of money and effort are being spent to develop an approach to address the hoax that is man-induced global warming, arguably the definition of nothing. While much …

Leon Panetta’s public service

By Jay Ambrose
Thanks, thanks and more thanks to Leon Panetta, a former congressman, secretary of Defense, budget director, White House chief of staff and head of three …

Tom Frieden’s Ebola hot seat

By Richard W. Carlson
The week was not a good one for Tom Frieden, the very political director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Right now, I’m …

Verbatim

By Tribune-Review
“The choice — ‘Operation Inherent Resolve’ — has both a loneliness and a longness about it, and even a sadness. It reflects both the dashed hopes of the past and the distance anticipated before future gains. It doesn’t inspire a …

Bowing to Putin’s power

By Jackson Diehl
To grasp how Vladimir Putin is progressing in his campaign to overturn the post-Cold War order in Europe, it’s worth looking beyond eastern Ukraine, where …

India & Pakistan’s mixed equation

By Huma Yusuf
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan Malala Yousafzai’s Nobel Peace Prize win was a rare, wonderful moment of pride for Pakistan. It was a feel-good bonus point that she shared the honor with Kailash Satyarthi. The joint award emphasized the fact that aspirations and …

LETTERS HOME ...

By Tribune-Review
Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons? Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words? The world’s a big place. Bring it home …

Our crumbling Constitution

By John Stossel
Does the Constitution still matter? The Constitution’s limits on government power helped create the most free and prosperous country on Earth. But now, some Americans, …

The governmnt & freedom

By Andrew P. Napolitano
FBI Director James Comey gave an interview to “60 Minutes” this month during which he revealed a flawed understanding of personal freedom. He rightly distinguished what FBI agents do in their investigations of federal crimes from what the NSA does …

Conservatism’s champion

By Tribune-Review
Who: Lowman Henry Age: 57 Residence: Harrisburg Occupation: Chairman and CEO of the Lincoln Institute of Public Opinion Research, a nonprofit educational foundation that promotes free-market and limited-government policies. Influential because: Henry promotes conservative causes as host of the “American …

Rand Paul & other GOP questions for 2016

By Doyle Mcmanus
Officially, not a single candidate is running for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination. But more than a dozen ambitious Republicans are holding serious conversations with …

Policing the Grammar Police

By Bill White
I’ve been taking such a beating from readers about one sentence in my most recent grammar column that I decided to address it a bit sooner rather than endure more behind-the-scenes chiding. Here’s the paragraph that got me in trouble: …

Ebola & common sense

By Pat Buchanan
While I was growing up in Washington in the 1930s and ’40s, our home was, several times, put under quarantine. A poster would be tacked on the door indicating the presence within of a contagious disease — measles, mumps, chicken …

Jindal’s time to shine

By Byron York
A few months ago, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal traveled to Washington to introduce a new national health care proposal. While there, he arranged to meet privately with a small group of conservative journalists and policy experts at the offices of …

Defend border, protect Americans

By Diana West
About a dozen news cycles ago, Americans seemed horrified by the border crisis — horrified by the tens of thousands of illegal aliens, many of them minors, crashing across the southern border. And now? The focus has weakened since the …

Family planning saves taxpayers billions

By Jason Millman
Publicly funded family planning services help low-income Americans avoid serious health conditions while saving billions of dollars each year, according to a new analysis — benefits that go beyond providing contraception. Past research from the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization …