TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Who will save whom?

Daily Photo Galleries

By Alexandra Petri
Monday, March 25, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

At the Atlantic, Megan Garber alerts us to the news that “whom” is falling out of fashion. It has been a gradual but inevitable process, somewhat like the heat death of the universe.

“It's not who you know,” the Rev. Peter Gomes used to intone, “it's whom.” It was the sort of statement one expected from someone dubbed the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister at Harvard.

We can do without “whom.” Or can we?

The Whos down in Whoville are perfectly safe. But the Whoms, down in Whomville, having staid, WASPy dinners of roast beast and refusing to pass Little Susie Lou Whom a slice unless she uses the subjunctive correctly in her request: They are in grave danger. Whom is struggling. After all, whom is, as numerous writers have noted, the literary equivalent of waving an enormous flag that proclaims you a Stuffy Old Twerp, a Bombastic Blowhard Who Thinks He's In England, or In 1800, Or Possibly Both.

Whom is no one's favorite object pronoun. All it plays now are the rusty ill-paid gigs of Old-Timey, Vaguely Biblical-Sounding Phrases. For Whom the Bell Tolls. For Of Those to Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required. To Whom It May Concern. From Whom All Blessings Flow.

Yes, whom is withering. Whither? Who can say. No one says “Whither.” Or “whence,” for that matter.

The subjunctive, over in the neighboring ward of the hospital, wants to know what is going on, as it were. “If ‘whom' were to go extinct,” it murmurs, “surely I would be next. But I do not think it likely.” The subjunctive never thinks it likely, which just shows what it knows.

Good grammar is like all those days you wear your underwear on the right side of your pants: It goes sadly unremarked upon. But slip up one time and that's what everyone mentions.

Grammar Nazis never stop you on the street to say, “What a beautiful subjunctive that was. Clear as a bell, and I loved the appositive you were rocking earlier. Fierce!” They just chase you down, like Javert, shouting, “Whom! Not who! Whom!”

Grammar Nazi is also one of the few Nazi comparisons that we have permitted to stand unchallenged. Few things are so irksome as the person who snaps up at you, shouting, “Don't give it to me and Tanya! Personal pronoun comes last!”

Perhaps it is time we change tactics. The vinegar approach to grammar certainly does not seem to be bearing much fruit. Maybe we should try honey. After all, grammar is the unseen wire undergirding even the most acrobatic sentence.

English is not an inflected language where subject and object are always instantly clear, and it's the hardworking Whoms and Whos of this world that help us skirt that issue. The more of these invisible wires we cut, the uglier our sentences will get. Compliment a stranger's grammar today. It may be our only hope.

Remember what John Donne might have said: “Any pronoun's death diminishes me, because I am involved in Language; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.” Of course, it tolled for “thee” a long, long time ago. Don't let it toll for whom.

Alexandra Petri is a Washington Post columnist and author of the ComPost blog at washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Steelers opt for youth, speed while revamping roster
  2. Steelers finalize 53-man roster
  3. Starkey: Pitt does its duty
  4. VND roundup: Kiski Area wins boys soccer opener
  5. Timing of summer’s end a matter of perspective for Western Pennsylvanians
  6. Carnegie Mellon grad’s tweak to tweets turns 7
  7. White House threat sparks call for wider immigration debate
  8. Pilot in Atlantic Ocean crash lost consciousness, Coast Guard says
  9. Chemical mix sickens two from South Greensburg
  10. Pirates’ Polanco runs into rookie wall
  11. High school roundup: Seton-La Salle captures Century Conference win
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.