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Mexico's treatment of 'undesirables'

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By Michelle Malkin
Sunday, March 31, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

American politicians in both parties are stampeding all over themselves to pander to Mexico and adopt illegal alien amnesty schemes. But while the Mexican government lobbies for more “humane” treatment of illegal border crossers from their country into ours, Mexico remains notoriously restrictionist toward “undesirable” foreigners who break their laws or threaten their security.

Despite widely touted immigration “reforms” adopted in 2011, Mexico still puts Mexico first — as any country that is serious about protecting its sovereignty should and would.

Article 33 of Mexico's Constitution establishes the right of the president to detain and deport “any foreigner” and prohibits foreigners from participating “in any way” in the political affairs of the country.

Article 32 unapologetically bans non-native-born people from holding sensitive jobs and joining the country's military. Preference is given unabashedly to Mexicans over foreigners.

As you read the following passage, consider the inexorable push by open-border groups to secure illegal alien “rights” to American jobs, military assignments, driver's licenses, discounted U.S. college tuition and ObamaCare: “Only Mexicans by birth can perform all government employments, positions, or commissions in which the status of citizenship is indispensable. During peacetime, foreigners shall neither serve in the Army nor in the police bodies. ... Mexicans shall have priority over foreigners, under equal circumstances, for all kind of concessions, employments, positions or commissions of the government in which the status of citizenship is not indispensable.”

While amnesty advocates and civil liberties zealots in the U.S. decry “police state” tactics against illegals, Mexico fiercely maintains laws against illegal border crossings, “verification visits” to enforce visa conditions, requirements that foreigners produce proof of legal status on demand, and enforcement and cooperation among immigration officials and law enforcement authorities at all levels in Mexico. Native-born Mexicans are also empowered to make citizen arrests of illegal aliens and turn them in to authorities.

Mexico's National Catalog of Foreigners tracks all outside tourists and foreign nationals. A National Population Registry tracks and verifies the identity of every member of the population, who must carry a citizen identity card. Visitors who do not possess proper documents and identification are subject to arrest at any time. And for those seeking permanent residency or naturalization, Mexico requires that they must not be economic burdens on society and must have clean criminal histories.

Those seeking to obtain Mexican citizenship must show a birth certificate, provide a bank statement proving economic independence, pass an exam and prove they can provide their own health care.

Applicants are assessed based on a point system using factors such as level of education, employment experience, and scientific and technological knowledge. Property acquisition and ownership by foreigners is still severely restricted. Mexican corporations are banned from hiring illegals.

If such self-interested “nativism” is right and good for the protection and survival of Mexico, why not for the United States?

Michelle Malkin is the author of “Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks and Cronies” (Regnery 2009).

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