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Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or

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Saturday, April 6, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

“States that extend Medicaid coverage to adults whose income is up to 138 percent of the poverty line will get the federal government to pick up the added costs — for the first three years. After that, the feds promise to pick up 90 percent of the tab forever. The states that choose to expand Medicaid this way will leave states like Louisiana, Wisconsin and North Carolina, which have declined the extension, subsidizing others. This is setting up trouble later.”

— Editorial from The Washington Times, advocating Medicaid block grants to states instead.

“We oppose same-sex marriage, but in the absence of a constitutional amendment enshrining our view it would be wrong for the Supreme Court to block it — and nobody has ever argued otherwise. Proponents of same-sex marriage feel no such inhibitions. The Supreme Court should be more dispassionate.”

— The editors of National Review, writing about the two gay-marriage cases heard last month by the U.S. Supreme Court.

“(G)lobal warming hysteria is based not on any accurate measurements of global climate, but rather on ‘proxies.' That is, scientists give their interpretation of tree rings and bacterial samples in fossils. Global warming ‘science' is strikingly similar to a witch doctor reading the entrails of a goat.”

— Jonathon Moseley, writing in the American Thinker about climate alarmists' vanishing credibility.

“(I)f the central political problem of Obamacare was that it created too many losers alongside its winners, then a successful conservative alternative would be a free-market approach that makes these losers whole again without depriving the winners of their new gains. This is a real possibility.”

— Jay Cost, writing in The Weekly Standard about how ObamaCare is more susceptible to reform than Medicare.

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