TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

A godless global economy

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

By Pat Buchanan
Friday, May 3, 2013, 8:57 p.m.
 

“This is called slave labor,” said Pope Francis.

He was referring to the $40 a month paid to apparel workers at that garment factory in Bangladesh that collapsed on top of them, killing more than 400.

“Not paying a just wage ... focusing exclusively on the balance books, on financial statements, only looking at personal profit. That goes against God!”

The pope is describing the dark side of globalism.

Why is Bangladesh, after China, the second-largest producer of apparel in the world? Because the Asian subcontinent is where Western brands — from Disney to Gap to Benetton — can produce cheapest. They can do so because women and children will work for $1.50 a day crammed into factories that are rickety firetraps, where health and safety regulations are nonexistent.

This is what capitalism, devoid of a conscience, will produce.

Not long ago, the shirts, skirts, suits and dresses Americans wore were “Made in the USA” — in plants in the Carolinas, Georgia and Louisiana, where lower wages, lighter regulations and air conditioning that came after World War II had attracted the factories from New England.

The American idea was that the 50 states and their citizens should compete with one another fairly. The feds set the health and safety standards that all factories had to meet and imposed wage and hour laws.

How did we prevent companies from shutting down here and going to places like today's Bangladesh? From James Madison to the mid-20th century, we had a tariff.

This provided revenue for the U.S. government to keep other taxes low and build the nation's infrastructure. Tariffs prevented exploiters of labor from getting rich here on sweatshops abroad.

Tariffs favored U.S. companies by letting them compete for free in the U.S. market, while a cover charge was placed on foreign goods entering the U.S. Foreign producers would pay tariffs for the privilege of competing here, while U.S. companies paid income taxes.

But in the late 20th century, America abandoned as “protectionism” what Henry Clay had called “The American System.” We gave up on economic patriotism. We gave up on the idea that the U.S. economy should be structured for the benefit of America and Americans first.

We embraced globalism.

The ideological basis of globalism was that, just as what was best for America was a free market where U.S. companies produce and sell anywhere freely and equally in the USA, this model can be applied worldwide.

As one might expect, the big boosters of the concept were the transnational corporations. They could now shift plants and factories out of the high-wage, well-regulated U.S. economy to Mexico, China and India, then to Bangladesh, Haiti and Cambodia.

The losers would be the companies that stayed in the U.S. and produced for the U.S. with American workers.

And so it came to pass. In the first decade of the century, America lost 5 million to 6 million manufacturing jobs, one in every three we had, as 55,000 factories closed.

Since Bush 41 touted his New World Order, we have run trade deficits of $10 trillion.

We built the global economy — by gutting our own.

Pat Buchanan is the author of “Suicide of a Superpower: Will America Survive to 2025?”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Agent: Polamalu undecided whether to play in 2015
  2. Loose barges on the Mon highlight woes of winter’s end
  3. Mt. Lebanon deer-culling corrals sprayed with urine, repellent
  4. Starkey: In defense of Mel Kiper Jr.
  5. Train hits PennDOT truck plow in Indiana County, driver not hurt
  6. Pitt oversight of background checks for youth camp staffers was spotty, audit finds
  7. Pittsburgh has enough salt despite delivery refusal on Thursday, official says
  8. Markleysburg man dies in crash on Route 40
  9. Angry fans cited in shortage of refs in Western Pennsylvania
  10. PennDOT announces Parkway closings and single lanes for next week, weather permitting
  11. Franklin Regional robotics team ready for FIRST Recycle Rush