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Verbatim

| Saturday, July 13, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

“A law granting special privileges to the press effectively gives the government the power to license the press by deciding who qualifies.”

— James Taranto, writing in The Wall Street Journal, on why a federal press “shield law” is a bad idea.

“How strange that a country that once tore itself apart over who said what about Valerie Plame now snores when its top officials lie under oath and the most intimate details of our national security are leaked to the press.”

Victor Davis Hanson, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, writing at NationalReviewOnline.com.

“As ever, increasing government education funding to students is pocketed by universities in the form of tuition increases. The never-ending federal effort to “make college affordable” simply provides the resources to sustain higher prices.”

— from a Wall Street Journal editorial.

“Proponents of political correctness say it is a way that we can be kind and courteous to everyone, but they need to recognize that it is quite possible to be respectful without imposing an unspoken law that is antithetical to one of the founding principles of our nation — namely, freedom of expression and freedom of speech.”

— Benjamin Carson, writing in The Washington Times.

“We can't have a stronger economy and more employment if we discard part of the power-generating capital stock. ... We cannot become richer over time by making ourselves poorer in the here and now.”

— Benjamin Zycher, an American Enterprise Institute scholar, writing in The American Magazine on the fallacy of the Obama administration's “green energy” programs.

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