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Cue the chickens

| Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

When he first entered the White House to worldwide acclaim, and backed by huge majorities in both the Senate and the House, Barack Obama could do whatever he wanted. And he could do no wrong in the eyes of the mainstream media.

People believed whatever he said, whether about how he would cut the federal deficit in half during his first term or how people could keep their current insurance and their current doctor under ObamaCare, which would also insure millions more people and yet somehow lower the costs at the same time.

Of course he did none of these things.

The Obama administration added more to the national debt in his first term than President Bush had in both his terms put together. As for ObamaCare, which has not yet fully taken effect, health care costs have already gone up and many people's work hours have been cut as employers seek to escape the huge costs of ObamaCare by hiring exempt part-time workers.

As for foreign policy, Obama began by betraying a pre-existing American commitment to allies in Eastern Europe to supply them with an anti-missile defense system. These nations had risked the wrath of Russia by allying themselves with the United States but Obama blithely talked about pressing the “reset button” as he flew off to Moscow to try to cut a deal with the Russians behind their back.

His boorish behavior toward one of our oldest and most important allies (Britain) and his insulting behavior toward the prime minister of our staunchest ally in the Middle East (Israel) were more of the same.

Meanwhile, Obama fawned over the rulers of other nations, bowing deeply from the waist before the king of Saudi Arabia and the emperor of Japan, in a gesture of subservience that no other president of the United States had ever stooped to. But the adoring media never asked the most obvious question: “What kind of man is this, who feels a need to lower his own country?”

Obama was caught by a microphone that he did not know was on, telling Russian President Medvedev to assure “Vladimir” that he could be more “flexible” with him after he was past the 2012 elections and was no longer constrained by the American voters.

Far from getting Putin's respect, he deservedly earned Putin's contempt.

At home, when Republicans in Congress tried to suggest some changes in the ObamaCare legislation, back when it was being rushed through Congress too fast for the congressmen to read it, Obama's response was to remind the Republicans that he had won the election.

Now these and other chickens have come home to roost.

Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

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