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The dangers of Scottish secession

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By George Robertson
Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

This time next year, the country known as the United Kingdom could be about to disappear.

If Scotland's separatist government gets its way in a referendum planned for September, the 300-year-old union of Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland ­— the United States' oldest and closest ally — will be on the road to disintegration.

That is a dramatic, though accurate, way of describing the possible secession of Scotland from one of the world's most successful political, social and economic unions.

The ties that bind the United Kingdom are strong but there would be profound international implications should the Scottish people choose secession. The residual United Kingdom would still be a major player in the world but upon losing a third of its land mass, 5 million of its population and a huge amount of credibility, its global standing would inevitably diminish.

The global balance would be substantially upset should one of the West's key unions, and its second-biggest defense power, split up. The United Kingdom has always punched above its weight diplomatically and militarily. A breakup would have a serious effect on its role in the world — all the more so because Britain's nuclear-deterrent base is in Scotland and those advocating separation have pledged to expel it. With the United States and other countries viewing a possible British withdrawal from the European Union as negative, how much more disturbing would they find a breakup of the country itself?

The ripple effects would not be limited to the United Kingdom. Other separatist movements in Europe are watching the Scottish debate with undisguised interest. In Spain, more than a million Catalans have turned out in the streets calling for independence. In the Basque Country, separatist violence has waned, but the desire for a separate state remains. In Belgium, whose unity hangs on a thread, Flemish nationalists have made it clear that if Scotland has a free pass to the European Union and NATO, they would be next in line. There could be more breakaways to come.

The re-Balkanization of Europe should give many pause. In a fragile, unstable world where problems and solutions are going global, going local would benefit no one. Separatism offers little by way of comfort to worried populations. It promises more strife and dissension.

Britain's friends around the world need to pay attention. A dangerous historic event might soon be upon us — with few people outside the U.K. even noticing.

Lord George Robertson was secretary general of NATO from 1999 to 2003 and Britain's defense secretary from 1997 to 1999. He represented a Scottish constituency in the House of Commons for 21 years and was the Labour Party's principal spokesman on Scotland from 1992 to 1997.

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